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Shakey’s eyes 250 outlets in next 5 years

International Family Food Services Inc., the operator of the Shakey’s Pizza Parlor franchise in the Philippines, said it plans to build a network of 200 to 250 stores in the country over the next five years amid strong consumer spending.

The company said it was also considering listing its shares with the stock exchange given the robust growth of the consumer industry.

“There are talks but nothing is final,” Mauricio Franco Jr., chief information officer of Shakey’s Philippines, said.

IFFSI is owned by the Prieto family, who also owns major interests in other food franchises in the Philippines, including Dunkin Donuts, Racks, Tia Marias and Project Pie.

IFFSI operates 165 Shakey’s stores in the Philippines and plans to end the year with 169 outlets.

The company said it planned to open 10 to 15 Shakey’s stores annually over the next five years to hit 200 to 250 stores.

Investment for one store is estimated between P15 million and P25 million.

IFFSI chief executive Vicente Gregorio said while the company would continue to put up stores in shopping malls, its focus would be building standalone stores, mostly in Metro Manila.

The company said Shakey’s emerged as the market leader in the family casual restaurant segment,  given its marketing innovations and improvement in customer service.

IFFSI said the company saw a significant increase in sales from delivery service due to worsening traffic conditions in Metro Manila.

Sales from delivery service, including online delivery, accountec for 30 percent of the company’s total sales.

“Our sales from delivery service have been growing by double digit. It now accounts for a third of our total business,” Franco said.

Meanwhile, the company continues to upgrade its system and plans to offer “good Wi-Fi” connection to its customers in all stores.

Shakey’s reached a milestone this year with a 40-year presence in the Philippines, since serving pizzas in Makati City in 1974.

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