Dutertenomics: Sustaining the  Economic Gains
Manila Standard Job Openings

Investing for Peace

Top business leaders and heads of development organizations met in a business forum organized by the Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP) chaired by businessman Manuel V. Pangilinan (MVP) with the hardworking and forward thinking Rafael Lopa as executive director.

In his welcome remarks, MVP acknowledged that everyone shares “a common vision that while political empowerment is key to sustainable peace, improvement of lives through jobs and livelihood are indispensable elements, that will complete the circle of welfare. Peace and development go hand in glove; one is neither sequential to, nor independent of, the other. As businessmen, we can also be bearers of peace. It is indeed time for deliverance for Mindanao, from its perils and poverty.”

 Joining hands for peace: World Bank country director Motoo Konishi; Asian development Bank country director Richard Bolt; Bangsamoro Development Agency chairman Dr. Saffrullah Dipatuan; Economic Cluster head Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala; Moro Islamic Liberation Front chief negotiator Mohagher Iqbal; PBSP chairman Manuel Pangilinan; Japan International Cooperative Agency chief representative Noriaki Niwa; Unifrutti Group Philippines chairman John Perrine; and Monark Equipment chairman Jose Antonio Banson.

For his part, head of the Economic Cluster of the National Summit Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala urged the Manila-based community to initiate a dialogue with the Bangsamoro leaders.

 Asian Development Bank country
director Richard Bolt explaining
ADB’s current initiatives and
multilateral agency programs
in the country.

Businessmen are ready to invest today and don’t wait to wait any longer, disclosed Unifrutti Group Philippines chairman John Perrine. In fact, agricultural companies committed $366 million for agriculture, and this is expected to open up as many 22,000 jobs. “Amid some fears that no one will go, no one will invest, these are the people that are ready to invest in the region today, now. They say the problem is lack of jobs, but this is something that would provide livelihood to the people in Bangsamoro,” Perrine stated.

Peace in Mindanao has been elusive; the long-running war has exacted immense loss of lives and property. Like a thief, the absence of peace had snatched away the dreams of Mindanaoans for a better life. But let us not allow these harsh realities to weaken our resolve to attain long lasting peace.

The alternative is not acceptable. If there is anything that history taught us, it is that war – stripped of its romantic or heroic notions – creates widows and orphans.

The forum provided a great opportunity for those in business to unite and join hands in ensuring peace in the war torn areas of Mindanao.

From left: Aboitiz Equity Ventures president Xavier
J. Aboitiz, PBSP chairman Manuel V. Pangilinan and
Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, head of the
Economic Cluster of the National Summit.
This columnist served as moderator during a lively
and informative open forum. From left is PBSP
consultant Lito Rivera, is Ayala Foundation president
Victoria P. Garchitorena and PBSP executive
director Rafael Lopa.
(From left) Megumi Moto, Japan International
Cooperation Agency’s (JICA) deputy director
general for Southeast Asia and Pacific; Noriaki
Niwa, Philippines’ chief representative JICA; and
Motoo Konishi, country director of the World Bank.

Bangsamoro Development Agency chairman Dr.
Saffrullah M. Dipatuan (second from left) presenting
a development plan. With him are National
Treasurer Roberto B. Tan; Atty. Ishak V. Mastura, chairman and managing head of the regional board
of investments – ARMM; and Land Bank of the
Philippines executive vice president Cecilia C.


COMMENT DISCLAIMER: Reader comments posted on this Web site are not in any way endorsed by The Standard. Comments are views by thestandard.ph readers who exercise their right to free expression and they do not necessarily represent or reflect the position or viewpoint of thestandard.ph. While reserving this publication’s right to delete comments that are deemed offensive, indecent or inconsistent with The Standard editorial standards, The Standard may not be held liable for any false information posted by readers in this comments section.