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Losing weight is more than just counting calories

When CICO, or calories in-calories out, became popular, many thought that they have found the “simple” secret equation to losing and managing weight. But the truth is, “there are a lot more factors other than that,” says Dr. Kerry Grann, the principal research scientist at Nutrilite Health Institute’s Clinical and Research Investigations department.

“In order to effectively maintain your weight, you need to balance the amount of calories that you consume with the amount of calories that you expend via physical activity. But most of us are not doing a very good job (in balancing them out),” declares Dr. Grann.

Proof is the increasing incidence of overweight and obesity, not only in developing countries. In fact, according to the World Health Organization, which classifies obesity as a disease, 25 percent of people in the Philippines belong to the overweight and obese categories. And Dr. Grann says the number continues to go up.

Based on several research, people tend to gain weight because of an inactive lifestyle (“we’re not getting the physical activity that we should get”), behavioral issues (“when we’re stressed out, we don’t make good food choices”), huge portion sizes (“we’re forgetting what’s the right portion size”), and income (“affordability of fresh food is not good so many are resorting to high-calorie, high-sugar and high-fat food”).

This kind of information challenged Nutrilite to develop BodyKey by Nutrilite, a weight management program that makes use of a comprehensive assessment based on validated questions to determine the best approach for each user.

BodyKey by Nutrilite is “a holistic and personalized health management solution,” says Dr. Grann. But the Doctor of Public Health avers that the program is not a quick fix, but rather a sustainable approach.

To address concerns of increasing obesity prevalence and higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in the Philippines, multi-billion direct selling company Amway officially introduced the BodyKey by Nutrilite recently.

 

What makes a person overweight

NHI’s research found six factors that significantly influence weight management: diet, meal habits, physical activity, mindset, sleep and stress. Referring to these key factors, BodyKey’s Personalized Assessment Tool, which is a downloadable app, asks users extensive questions (i.e. family history, age, physical activity, etc.) based on scientifically validated data to come up with a customized approach, also backed by research, to help in reaching your weight goals.

In order to lose weight, Dr. Grann emphasizes the importance of knowing what kind of diet best works for you. It’s not a one-size-fits-all, she says. Some are sensitive to carbohydrates (insulin is not working well) and some are not. “The Assessment Tool makes sure the recommended meal plans are personalized,” informs Dr. Grann.

The BodyKey assessment also determines if your meal habits are good and if you’re eating the right portion size your body needs. What is the right meal habit to manage the pounds? Dr. Grann stresses to never skip breakfast. “One of the key behaviors of people who successfully manage their weight over the long-term is that they eat breakfast,” she says. “Because when we skip breakfast we often overeat on the next meal.”

Feel light with Nutrilite. The BodyKey Jump Start Kit, when used in conjunction with the customized program recommended by the Assessment Tool, is said to reduce four to eight percent of body weight in two months.

She posits that breakfast should also be the biggest meal as the body slows down as the day progresses.

Once food intake is considered, physical activity comes next. While diet trumps exercise, the latter remains important because “it has positive impact on the way our body functions (makes insulin work better, burns fat, improves sleep and reduces stress).”

Dr. Grann says their research recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise every week, on top of two hours per day of moving, per WHO.

Sleep is a factor often neglected, but in reality, it plays a huge role when you want to take control of your weight. “Research shows if we sleep less than seven hours a day, we have a much higher prevalence of overweight and obesity as sleep deprivation negatively impacts a lot of hormones that works with weight management,” reveals Dr. Grann. She recommends at least seven to nine hours of sleep per day, preferably from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Ways on how to manage stress and how to have the right mindset are also given after the evaluation. “We provide practical strategies that people can easily follow.”

 

The tools that help in weight management

Once the assessment is done, users of the BodyKey program can use the Nutrilite Jump Start Kit to help them ease into a new and healthier lifestyle.

To get all nutrients our body needs without consuming large amounts of food, there’s the Meal Replacement Shake that comes in Chocolate and Vanilla flavors. “When mixed with 250-ml. low-fat milk, it meets all the requirements for a complete meal,” shares Dr. Grann. One serving is equal to 12 vitamins, 13 minerals, 15-g. protein and 5-g. fiber.

“The fiber and protein help you feel full as they positively impact hormones and balance blood sugar levels,” the doctor explains.

The InBodyBand, on the other hand, tracks your physical activities and reminds you to keep moving. It’s wearable and comes with a body composition measurement. Completing the kit are the Nutrilite All Plant Protein, Nutri Fiber Blend Tablets, and Nutrilite Double X.

The whole jump start kit is available for P20,695 and comes with five Meal Replacement Shake, two All Plant Protein, one 31-day supply of Double X, one Nutri Fiber Blend, one InBodyBand, one blender bottle, one BMI measuring tape and one gym bag.

For more information, visit www.bodykey.ph

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