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Public warned against dubious Malaysia jobs

Prospective overseas Filipino jobseekers are warned against dubious high paying-jobs in Malaysia being offered  by a Malaysian-based recruitment agency, the Department of Foreign Affairs said.

“The Philippine Embassy in Kuala Lumpur cautions Filipinos against falling victim to dubious job offerings with supposed high salaries in Miri and Bintulu in Malaysia’s Sarawak state,” the DFA said in a statement.     

“The embassy has received reports of Filipinos being recruited for alleged well-paying jobs in Miri and Bintulu in Sarawak but ended up working in bars and restaurants as guest relations officers or waiters and were not paid proper salaries, and have no employment benefits while their passports are taken by employers,” Foreign Affairs said.

It also said that some of them end up in debt bondage, as they were    asked to pay huge sums of money before they can get their passports back and be allowed to return home.     

The embassy also informed the Filipinos that foreigners who travel to Sarawak and other parts of Malaysia as tourists cannot work legally.  

“Those who wish to work in Malaysia will have to first secure their employment visas in their countries of origin before coming over. Otherwise, they may end up being victimized by human traffickers,” the department said.

The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration advised overseas workers to secure employment visas before going overseas for work.

The embassy also reminds Filipinos to be vigilant and not to deal with unlicensed individuals or any agencies that are not accredited by the POEA.  

The DFA has encouraged the public to verify job offers with the POEA in Manila or the Embassy’s Philippine Overseas Labor Office before making travel plans.  

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