Dutertenomics: Sustaining the  Economic Gains
Manila Standard Job Openings

‘Jenny’ boosts monsoon

TROPICAL storm “Jenny” (international name Dujuan) strengthened into a severe tropical storm on Thursday afternoon and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration said it will likely strengthen the prevailing southwestern monsoon.

The eye of Jenny was spotted 1,180 km east of Aparri, Cagayan at 4 p.m. Thursday with maximum sustained winds of 95 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 120 kph.

Pagasa weather forecaster Aldczar Aurelio said no public storm warning signal has been raised because the storm was still too far from the country.

Typhoon ‘Jenny’. Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical Astronomical Services Administration forecaster Aldczar Aurelio briefs newsmen on Tropical Storm ‘Jenny’ which entered the Philippine area of responsibility before dawn Thursday. EY ACASIO

But intensified monsoon winds will bring cloudy skies with light to moderate rains and isolated thunderstorms over Cagayan Valley, Mimaropa, Bicol Region, Visayas, Zamboanga Peninsula, Northern Mindanao, CARAGA and the provinces of Cavite and Batangas, he said.

Metro Manila and the rest of the country will be partly cloudy to cloudy with isolated thunderstorms.

Coastal waters throughout the archipelago will be moderate to rough as moderate to strong winds blow from the northwest to west over Luzon, and from the southwest to west over Visayas and Mindanao.

Despite Jenny, however, the water level at Angat Dam in Bulacan has continued to drop.

The weather bureau said the dam’s water elevation plunged to189.60 meters from Wednesday’s 189.65 meters, citing the lack of rainfall over the Angat watershed due to the El Niño.

The Bulacan local government has requested a series of cloud seeding operations to bring back Angat Dam’s level to normalcy.

Pagasa said a mature and strong El Niño is already present in the Pacific Ocean to be potentially among the four strongest since 1950.

“Below normal rainfall is expected to affect most areas in the country until the El Niño tapers down by the middle of 2016,” it said.


COMMENT DISCLAIMER: Reader comments posted on this Web site are not in any way endorsed by The Standard. Comments are views by thestandard.ph readers who exercise their right to free expression and they do not necessarily represent or reflect the position or viewpoint of thestandard.ph. While reserving this publication’s right to delete comments that are deemed offensive, indecent or inconsistent with The Standard editorial standards, The Standard may not be held liable for any false information posted by readers in this comments section.