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Task force intercepts P2m of shabu in Dumaguete

MANILA—A task group created to curb drug smuggling and other illegal activities in airports has intercepted a package containing 400 grams of methampethamine, more popularly known as shabu, at the Dumaguete Airport last Sept. 20.

The Inter-Agency Interdiction Task Group stopped the shipment in an LBC package aboard a Cebu Pacific flight to said city from Manila.

According to a report, the task force received information about a package aboard flight 5J625. Upon the flight’s arrival, the team used sniffing dogs and x-ray machines and discovered the package hidden among biscuits.

The drugs are estimated to be worth P2 million.

The team opened the cargo in the presence of the Philippine National Police Aviation Security Group, the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines—Security and Intelligence Service  and personnel of Cebu Pacific and LBC.

Reports said the box was sent through LBC by shipper Richard Cabansag of Marcos Avenue, Talon Las Piñas, to be claimed by consignee Joseph Cabansag of Unit 4G/F JFT Center Mall located at Perdices and Colon Street, in Dumaguete City.

The consignee was arrested the following day, Sept. 21, when he claimed the cargo at the LBC office.

The task force was created for airports under CAAP control and jurisdiction. It is composed of representatives from Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency, Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, Office of Transportation Security, Bureau of Customs, Bureau of Immigration, Department of Justice, National Bureau of Investigation and Philippine National Police Aviation Security Group.

CAAP is responsible for the operations of 82 airports in the country with 42 of them handling commercial flight operations.

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