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Make way for Mabuhay Lanes — MMDA

The Department of Interior and Local Government has ordered community leaders to clear all road obstructions for the reopening of Mabuhay Lanes, alternate routes for private motorists avoiding the congested Epifanio de los Santos Avenue.

The Metro Manila Development Authority came up with the decision to reopen the Mabuhay Lanes following a meeting with Metro Manila mayors and officials of Philippine National Police–Highway Patrol Group to find solution to the traffic problem in Metro Manila.

Traffic obstruction. It’s business as usual at the Balintawak Market in Quezon City despite the on-and-off campaign launched by the city government to prevent sidewalk vendors from illegally occupying the road.  Jansen Romero

MMDA traffic engineering chief Neomie Recio said the DILG has marching orders for barangay officials to clear Mabuhay Lanes (formerly Christmas lanes) of obstructions such as basketball courts, videokes, illegally parked vehicles and even small eateries and canteens.

“The DILG has already manned and instructed the barangays to clear these roads. If these obstructions will be removed, Edsa will no longer be congested as motorists have options to take alternate routes,” she said.

Recio said private motorists can use the 17 Mabuhay Lanes on their way to various commercial centers n Metro Manila. “We have shortcuts to Greenhills, Divisoria and Baclaran. If you are coming from NLEX [North Luzon Espressway], there is no need to use Edsa.”

The Metro Manila mayors decided to help the MMDA to clear the Mabuhay Lanes in their jurisdiction and also  provide help to  traffic enforcers.

The MMDA usually implements the scheme during Christmas season to help private motorists   avoid heavy traffic during the holiday rush. The special lanes were opened as alternate routes to shorten the travel time during the holidays, when traffic flow is expected to be heavy.

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