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Tax court orders Cedric Lee’s arrest

Businessman Cedric Lee and his estranged wife,  Judy Gutierrez,  are ordered arrested by the Court of Tax Appeals on charges of evading P194.47 million in tax.

“Let a Warrant of Arrest be issued against the remaining accused,

Judy Gutierrez Lee and Cedric Lee, and the bail bond for their provisional liberty is set at P20,000 for each accused,” the tax court said on  Monday.

Cedric Lee

“This court finds the existence of probable cause to issue a warrant of arrest against the accused.”

The couple has been charged with four counts of tax evasion cases.

The tax court, however, lifted its arrest warrant on a co-accused ­—John Ong, chief operating officer of Izumo Contractors Inc.—after he posted a bail of P80,000 for four counts of the tax cases. Lee is the president of Izumo Contractors Inc.

Last July, in a 13-page resolution, the Department of Justice approved the filing of tax evasion cases against the Lees and Ong for the under-declaration of the company’s income by 1,602 percent from 2006 to 2009.

DoJ rejected Lee’s “flimsy defense” that it was the firm’s accountant who prepared its income tax return.

Assistant state prosecutor Stewart Allan Mariano the indictment of the three accused which was a proved by senior assistant state prosecutor Susan Dacanay and prosecutor general Claro Arellano.

Based on the certifications secured by the Bureau of Internal Revenue from the clients of Izumo, the company was able to earn P302.63 million, but only declared a shared income of P76.22 million from 2006 to 2009.

Lee was also formerly charged with grave coercion and serious illegal detention over the alleged mauling incident of television host-actor Vhong Navarro. In September 2014, he posted a P500,000 bail for his provisional liberty.

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