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Youngest designer wins in Project Runway PH

Twenty-one-year-old Joy Chicano flew all the way from Eastern Samar to showcase and impress seasoned designers with his own visual idea of what a good wardrobe should look like.

Last Sunday, at the finale of ETC’s Project Runway Philippines, Chicano realized his dream after he was announced winner of this season’s fashionable competition aired Sunday, Sept. 21.

Chicano, who loves to experiment with shapes and patterns to make his design scream “avant-garde,” walked home bagged the cash prize of P250,000.00 (to start his new collection), and as part of the package given to him, he will also get a spread in Mega Magazine to showcase his work.

Young designer Joy Chicano of Eastern Samar is the winner  in the latest season of Project Runway Philippines

In an interview with the press, in a lunch organized by ETC last Wednesday, the budding designer talked about how he discovered his own aesthetic sense and style by playing with patterns.

“I channel my emotions through my work. I guess it would be hard for me to function if it’s the other way around. It allows me to visualize what the piece I’m going to create will look like. In the same sense, all my emotions are translated in my designs and they dictate what the final look of the wardrobe would be,” he told the select members of the press. 

This Hotel and Management student had to defy his parents to pursue his dream of becoming a fashion designer. He said his parents stopped giving his allowance and did not support his education when he decided to drop out of school and enroll at the Fashion Institute of the Philippines. True enough, Chicano succeeded in following his gut feeling.

 “I went to Manila on my own because I felt that it was the right thing to do, even if it meant rebelling against my parents,” Chicano shared.

he other designers that made it to the Top 3 along with Chicano were Celine Borromeo of Cebu and Jared Servano of Koronadal City.


Bringing geek culture mainstream

Renowned artists, celebrities and pop-culture icons came out to participate in the first international convention themed around comics, films, toys, animation, games and cosplay held at the World Trade Center from Sept. 17 to 20.

These big names gladly participated in panel interviews, photo ops, autograph sessions and a meet and greet with fans. Visitors who shared mostly the same interests were treated to programs and competitions lined up for the biggest pop culture convention.

Allison Harvard (third from right) with VampyBit Me  and  Jeremy Shada and his band Makeout Monday

Billed APCC or AsiaPop Comicon, it attracted exhibitors from genres of pop culture and top studios across the globe who brought popular brands and exclusive content for the four-day event.

Leading the pack of popular names to grace the APCC Manila 2015 were British actor Paul Bettany, Game of Thrones star Nathalie Emmanuel, and Glee star Mark Salling. They were also joined by singer and voice actor Jeremy Shada, Arrow star Colton Haynes, and America’s Top Model alumni Allison Harvard, who sat as one of the judges in the cosplay competition along with cosplay superstars Alodia Gosiengfiao and VampyBit Me.

British actor Paul Bettany in a photo op with a fan during  the APCC's last day at the World Trade Center

The cosplay competition known as the Cosplay Authority Global Challenge (The Cage) is considered as the biggest competition of its kind where the winner received a payout of up to $10,000.

Focusing on delivering the ultimate fan experience, APCC aspires to bring geek culture mainstream and stand tall as perfect launch pad to unveil new products and first look of movies for the Asia Pacific region. But ultimately, APCC’s larger purpose is to become a venue for celebrities and brands to interact with their fans on a one-on-one basis.

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