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What could be left is Miami’s movie in my mind

LET us not be carried by emotions.

We want Miami to win today because its coach is Erik Spoelstra, a Filipino-American whose mother hails from San Pablo City in Laguna?

But if love is a second-hand emotion, basketball wars are all about guts and fleshes never backing off from head-on clashes.

We want San Antonio to lose today because that would mean giving Miami a reprieve?

But pity diminishes the spirit and makes the strong weak and vulnerable.

We are a forgiving race?  So that praying for a Miami win today would find favor with the gods of the game?

Never mind that Miami stole last year’s title when it snatched Game 6 from the jaws of defeat.

Again, how did it happen?

The Spurs were ticks away from the 2013 NBA crown.  Then, with time expiring, Ray Allen buried a three to forge an overtime won by the Heat en route to a crown-clinching Game 7 victory.

So painful that setback was it gave Tim Duncan, the chief Spur, nightmares even a year after.

“When I think about the Finals last year, it always gives me the creeps,” Duncan said before the 2014 Finals.  “Now we are back in the Finals.  We just need four wins to avenge that bitter defeat.”

Enjoying an imposing 3-1 bulge now in the best-of-seven series, Duncan and the Spurs have all week to fulfill redemption.

I think even a rocket scientist can no longer save Spo and his Heat from defeat.  Or will LeBron, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh become Three Musketeers once more and turn the tide in their favor?  Again?

My lips are sealed.

But honestly, I do not have a solid story to make Miami win today.  How can I weave one tale believable enough amid those blowout losses the Heat had absorbed in Games 3 & 4?

Those back-to-back debacles of 111-92 in Game 3 and 107-86 in Game 4 are more than screaming proofs the series has practically become the exclusive property of the Spurs.

Look, include San Antonio’s 110-95 Game 1 victory and you have a horrific combined winning margin of 55 points for the Spurs in three games.

And what was Miami’s winning edge in Game 2?

A measly two points 98-96.  And all because LeBron James had 35 points in that game.  And all because turnovers in the stretch struck the Spurs silly.

But make no mistake.  The Heat won Game 2 on mere breaks with James capitalizing on them.  The other three games were won by the Spurs on pure merit with teamwork dished out to the hilt.

The Heat own the planet’s best player today in James but, alas, the Spurs own the planet’s best team today from the last bench-warmer to Dunkin’ Duncan.

I rooted, am rooting still, for Miami.  And all because on the veins of the Heat’s coach run Filipino blood.

You can lose in real-time, but never with the movie in your mind.

And I’m not being emotional.

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ALL IN     You know why San Miguel Beer convincingly avenged its cruel defeat to Air21 on Saturday in Binan, Laguna?  Double-teaming – triple-teaming at times – did it.  Plus, the Beermen were always on attack mode, which is actually the team’s No. 1 weapon from the start.  Also, if Sol Mercado and Chris Ross are completely focused, they can yet morphed into the most lethal 1-2 backcourt punch in the league.  I think even Robert Non, the no-nonsense San Miguel Corp. top gun, had seen this coming as I saw him watching the Saturday carnage with eagle eyes. Cheers!

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